Tendonitis

Do you suffer from Tendonitis and would like to learn more?

What is a Tendon? What is Tendonitis? What are the main causes of Tendonitis? How did it happen, and how can you treat it? I often get asked these questions in my physiotherapy clinic!

A tendon is basically a type of tissue that connects a muscle to a bone, and if it gets inflamed, the condition is called tendonitis It is a condition that Physiotherapists treat on a daily basis.

It commonly occurs in the shoulder, elbow, knee, wrist and heel, although it can happen anywhere that tendons are found in the body.

I have put together some easy to understand articles that explains tendonitis - perhaps a good place to start is with the page that looks at the causes, symptoms and how you treat Tendonitis.

Sponsored links

Hip Tendonitis »

Hip Tendonitis

When tendons in your hip are working well they glide perfectly as their related muscle contracts. When a tendon is inflamed the action of their contracting muscle pulling on them irritates them further and more inflammation and pain results.

Read more …

Shoulder Tendonitis »

Shoulder Tendonitis

Shoulder tendonitis is an inflammation of a tendon attaching to your shoulder. Although there are many tendons involved in your shoulder the most common tendonitis’s that I see in my physiotherapy practice relate to the rotator cuff complex.

Read more …

Tendonitis Treatment »

Tendonitis Treatment

What is Tendonitis? What causes it? Where does it occur in the body? Find out about the underlying causes of tendonitis and how to treat it.

Read more …

DISCLAIMER

The materials contained on this website are provided for general information and educational purposes only and do not constitute medical advice on any particular individual situation. Please see your Chartered Physiotherapist or other medical practitioner for full and individual consultation.

Please read the full disclaimer here.

Cookies and Privacy

By using this website, you consent to the use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy. For more information on how we use cookies, please read our cookie policy here.

Back to topˆ